Weekend Picks

National Indigenous History Month

Embrace the responsibility to connect to the stories and shared experiences that help us better understand who we are as Treaty People.

Stories

Kuessipan

Two childhood friends from the same Quebec Innu community begin to realize that they face very different futures.Based on the novel by Naomi Fontaine (Innu Nation) | Starring  Starring Sharon Fontaine-Ishpatao (Innu Nation) & Yamie Grégoire (Innu Nation)

The Lesser Blessed

Larry, a 16-year-old Tlicho Indian, lives in the small northern town of Fort Simmer. He has a crush on his classmate, Juliet Hope. Larry’s past holds a variety of terrors—his father is abusive and he once had an accident that nearly killed him. When Johnny Beck, a young Métis from Hay River, moves to town, things heat up, for better or worse.

Based on the novel by Richard Van Camp (Dogrib Tłı̨chǫ of the Dene Nation)

Indian Horse

Saul is a great native hockey player who overcomes racism in the 1970s then ultimately becomes tempted by alcoholism.

Based on the novel by Richard Wagamese (Ojibwe). Film Cast 

Real Life

nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up

On August 9, 2016, a young Cree man named Colten Boushie died from a gunshot to the back of his head after entering Gerald Stanley’s rural property with his friends. The jury’s subsequent acquittal of Stanley captured international attention, raising questions about racism embedded within Canada’s legal system and propelling Colten’s family to national and international stages in their pursuit of justice. Sensitively directed by Tasha Hubbard, nîpawistamâsowin weaves a profound narrative encompassing the filmmaker’s own adoption, the stark history of colonialism on the Prairies, and a vision of a future where Indigenous children can live safely on their homelands.

Directed by Tasha Hubbard (Cree)

Reel Injun: On the Trail of the Hollywood Indian

The evolution of the depiction of Native Americans in film, from the silent era until today, featuring clips from hundreds of movies and candid interviews with famous directors, writers and actors, Native and non-Native: how their image on the screen transforms the way to understand their history and culture.

Directed by Neil Diamond (Cree)

Indigenous Cinema at the NFB 

Weekend Picks

Pride Picks Vol. II

Get things started this weekend with some picks, then join the watch party for Saturday Church with Teen Services Librarian, Celeste, and Outloud St. Albert.

Registration is open! 

We Were Here

‘We Were Here’ is the first film to take a deep and reflective look back at the arrival and impact of AIDS in San Francisco, and how the City’s inhabitants dealt with that unprecedented calamity. It explores what was not so easy to discern in the midst of it all—the parallel histories of suffering and loss, and of community coalescence and empowerment.

Reaching for the Moon

In 1951, New York poet Elizabeth Bishop travels to Rio de Janeiro to visit Mary, a college friend. The shy Elizabeth is overwhelmed by Brazilian sensuality. She is the antithesis to Mary’s dashing partner, architect Lota de Macedo Soares. Mary is jealous, but unconventional Lota is determined to have both women at all costs. This eternal triangle plays out against the backdrop of the military coup of 1964. Bishop’s moving poems are at the core of a film which lushly illustrates a crucial phase in the life of this influential Pulitzer prize-winning poet.

Laurence Anyways

The story of an impossible love between a woman named Fred and a transgender woman named Laurence who reveals her inner desire to become her true self.

 

 

Joanne’s Mystery Picks

Still having trouble concentrating long enough to read a full novel?  Well here are a couple of great anthologies, containing short stories from some of the greats, as well as a riveting podcast from the U.K.

Murder on the Railways contains stories from Agatha Christie, Elmore Leonard, Leslie Charteris, Ken Follett, Maeve Binchy, Roald Dahl, Ruth Rendell, and many more.  For railway buffs, it doesn’t get better than this, and for the general mystery lover, you’ve hit the jackpot here!

The Television Detectives’ Omnibus brings us stories from the likes of Orson Welles, Agatha Christie, Ruth Rendell, Margery Allingham, Colin Dexter, Dorothy L. Sayers, and more.  Each story is a gem in itself, bringing to life, so succinctly, some of our favorite sleuths.

I’ve been listening to a podcast called SHEDUNNIT (shedunnitshow.com) recently and find it very interesting.  Caroline Crampton, the creator of the series, discusses the golden age of detective fiction. Each new installment deals with a different topic, whether it be a particular author, themes in detective fiction, or the reconstruction of a real life crime.  

There are at least a couple of stories in each of the anthologies that earn 5 daggers.  The SHEDUNNIT podcast is a definite 5 daggers!

Joanne gives this book 5 stars out of 5!
Joanne gives some of the stories and the SHEDUNNIT podcast 5 daggers out of 5!

Weekend Picks

Pride Picks

Our fabulous film collection is all about Pride! Here are a few flicks to get celebrating this weekend. Stay tuned for more Pride Picks and how you can celebrate throughout the month.

Rafiki

Kena and Ziki long for something more. Despite the political rivalry between their families, the girls resist and remain close friends, supporting each other to pursue their dreams in a conservative society. When love blossoms between them, the two girls will be forced to choose between happiness and safety.

The Normal Heart

The story of the onset of the HIV-AIDS crisis in New York City in the early 1980s, taking an unflinching look at the nation’s sexual politics as gay activists and their allies in the medical community fight to expose the truth about the burgeoning epidemic to a city and nation in denial.

A Fantastic Woman

Marina’s life is thrown into turmoil following the death of her partner. Mourning the loss of the man she loved, she finds herself under intense scrutiny from those with no regard for her privacy.