One Arranged Murder
by Chetan Bhagat

Keshav and Saurabh are business partners as well as flatmates and best friends. That is until Keshav falls in love with Prerna and wedding plans are being made. When things go awry, Keshav turns to his best friend for help and the two of them collaborate on solving a grisly murder.

Steeped in customs, food, and culture, Bhangat creates a colorful depiction of life in Delhi.  Initially I would reach for my dictionary (Google) for the definition of some of the words used in the telling, but slowly it became easier to understand what was meant through the context of the sentences and paragraphs.  With occasional laugh-out-loud passages and descriptions of the day-to-day interactions of family members, the story unfolds methodically and keeps the reader’s attention.

Joanne gives this book 3 daggers out of 3!

The Unlocking Season
By Gail Bowen

Family has always been at the heart of Bowen’s series featuring Joanne Kilbourn (now Kilbourn-Shreve).  Now at the age of 60 Joanne is going back to her adolescence when she and Sally Love were the best of friends.  Sisters and Strangers, a new six-part TV series, is being produced by her good friend Roy Brodnitz who has asked her to work on the script.  It captures the tumultuous time between two men – Joanne’s biological father and the man she called father throughout her youth and the relationships that were made and broken during those years.

Before production even begins, Roy Brodnitz disappears and is later found in a state of severe hysteria and fear.  Nothing prepares Joanne and the production crew for his horrible death and Joanne is determined to find out the circumstances leading up to it.  Supported by family and close friends, Joanne is forced to make some serious decisions about what she should reveal in order to preserve Roy’s legacy.  Which skeletons should remain in the closet?

Joanne gives this book 3 daggers out of 5!

Joanne’s Mystery Picks

The Flood
By Kristina Ohlsson

This is the sixth book in Ohlsson’s series featuring detectives Fredrika Bergman and Alex Recht.  Not having read the previous novels, I knew nothing about the back story of these characters so I was often left wondering what had prompted certain behaviours or actions.  The detectives are faced with a series of very gruesome murders , questioning how someone could devise such horrible ways of killing.  I questioned this, too, but in reference to how Ohlsson came up with the ideas to begin with.  It made me reflect on a conversation I had with Michael Redhill, (writing as Inger Ash Wolfe) author of the Hazel Micallef series, at Starfest one year.  I asked him this very question about where he comes up with such bizarre ways of killing his characters.  He said that the answer is as close as the internet!  

Recht and Bergman eventually realize that there is a common denominator to the murders and that they are looking for a serial killer.  Their investigation is hampered by doubt and sabotage by other members of their division as they scramble to find the next clue that will help them stop the carnage.

The most puzzling thing about this book is its title and its description: The Flood: The water is rising.  And the bodies are too.  There is no flood in the story and water plays no part in it whatsoever.  If the title is a metaphor for something, then I’m baffled as to what it could be.

Joanne gives this book 3 daggers out of 5!